Cover of: Puritanism | Thomas Winthrop Coit Read Online
Share

Puritanism or, A churchman"s defense against its aspersions, by an appeal to its own history ... by Thomas Winthrop Coit

  • 276 Want to read
  • ·
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by D. Appleton & Co., G. S. Appleton in New York, Philadelphia .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New England

Subjects:

  • Puritans,
  • New England -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy Thomas W. Coit ...
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBX9329 .C7
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, [13]-527, [1] p.
Number of Pages527
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7019436M
LC Control Number10013334
OCLC/WorldCa1877719

Download Puritanism

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Puritanism: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) - Kindle edition by Bremer, Francis J.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Puritanism: /5(13). Although this book has many of the quantities of an outline or heads of proposals rather than a formal history or a narrative, it substantially expanded my own understanding of how puritan New England was perhaps the most consequential expression of the English constitutional crisis Cited by: 5. Puritanism, a religious reform movement in the late 16th and 17th centuries that was known for the intensity of the religious experience that it fostered. Puritans’ efforts contributed to both civil war in England and the founding of colonies in America. Learn more about Puritanism, its history, and beliefs. This monumental book traces how Puritanism was a catalyst for profound cultural changes in the early modern Atlantic world, opening the door for other dissenter groups such as the Baptists and the Quakers, and leaving its enduring mark on what counted as true religion in America.

  The Puritans were members of a religious reform movement that arose in the late 16th century and held that the Church of England should eliminate ceremonies and practices not rooted in . PURITANISM. its most common historical usage Puritanism refers to a movement within English Protestantism in both the British Isles and colonial America. Some historians, identifying the essence of Puritanism as a reaction to the tardy pace of the English Reformation, date it from the activities of William Tyndale ( – ) and John Hooper (d. ) in the formative years.   Puritanism first emerged in the 16th and 17th centuries in England as a movement to remove all vestiges of Catholicism from the Anglican Church. The Anglican Church first separated from Catholicism in , but when Queen Mary took the throne in , she reverted it to Catholicism. Under Mary, many Puritans faced : Brette Sember. Puritanism, in the 16th and 17th cent., a movement for reform in the Church of England that had a profound influence on the social, political, ethical, and theological ideas of England and America. Origins Historically Puritanism began early (c) in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I .

The book explores issues of gender, literature, politics and popular culture in addition to addressing the Puritans' core concerns such as theology and devotional praxis, and coverage extends to Irish, Welsh, Scottish and European versions of Puritanism as well as to English and American practice. For the book by Alasdair Gray see The Book of Prefaces. A Book of Prefaces is H. L. Mencken's collection of essays criticizing American culture, authors, and movements. Mencken described the work as "[My] most important book in its effects upon my professional career." In fact, the book was considered vitriolic enough that Mencken's close friend Alfred Knopf was concerned about publishing. Puritanism. K likes. Puritanism was a movement in the late 16th and 17th Centuries to purify the Church of ers: K.   Even Alexis de Tocqueville, after studying America in the s, declared that Puritanism was the primary foundation that gave rise to our democratic republic. Some well-known Puritans are John Bunyan (The Pilgrim’s Progress), John Winthrop (“City upon a Hill” sermon), Cotton Mather, and John Foxe (Foxe’s Book of Martyrs).